Agreement Phrase

Languages cannot have any conventional correspondence, such as Japanese or Malay; Little, as in English; a small amount, as in spoken French; a moderate amount, as in Greek or Latin; or a large quantity, as in Swahili. In Hungarian, verbs are polypersonal, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its (precise) object. There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, him or her specifically). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is a correspondence between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often relates more or less precisely to the person). There is also a correspondence in sex between pronouns and precursors. Examples of this can be found in English (although English pronouns mainly follow natural sex and not grammatical sex): most Slavic languages are very withered, with the exception of Bulgarian and Macedonian. The correspondence is similar to Latin, for example between adjectives and nouns in gender, number, uppercase and lowercase (if counted as a separate category). The following examples come from Serbokroatic: example (iii) illustrates that a verb sentence composed of a combination of a finite verb and an unfinished verb is always finite. A rare type of chord that phonologically copies parts of the head instead of corresponding to a grammatical category. [4] For example, in Bainouk: (2) We must understand that [native speakers of English] more or less automatically make the subject-verb correspondence correctly.

Spoken French always distinguishes the plural from the second person and the first person plural in formal language and from the rest of the present in all verbs in the first conjugation (Infinitive in -lui) except all. The plural form of the first person and the pronoun (nous) are now generally replaced in modern French by the pronoun on (literally: « un ») and a singular form of the third person. This is how we work (formally) on the work. In most verbs of other conjugations, each person in the plural can be distinguished between them and singular forms, again when the traditional first person is used in the plural. The other endings that appear in written English (that is: all the singulated endings and also the third person plural of verbs that are not with the infinitesi-il) are often pronounced in the same way, except in connection contexts. . . .